Join the debate on online video journalism

Welcome to our new blog all about online video journalism. As a group of broadcast journalism students based at City University, London we are interested in the issues surrounding gathering and publishing online video, the impact of online video on journalism and how it has come to be recognised as a powerful medium in its own right. The blog will explore aspects of this using a variety of media tools based on our specific interests. Enjoy, and join the debate by commenting!

Interview with British Heavyweight Champion Dereck Chisora

Dereck Chisora is the current British and Commonwealth Heavyweight boxing champion. A couple of months ago I went to an open press event as he was preparing for a shot at the world title against Wladimir Klitschko. Unfortunately the fight has been cancelled twice and it now seems unlikely Chisora will get a chance to fight Klitschko after the Ukranian agreed to fight another Briton, WBA World Heavyweight champion David Haye.

Dereck Chisora

In the interview below, Chisora seemed very confident of beating the much more fancied Klitschko but it is fair to say the majority of the press pack didn’t agree with him. I must say after watching Chisora train up close, I didn’t think he had much of a chance either. He looked to have a good punch on him but he seemed rather slow on his feet. Obviously this was only a sparring session and he was probably holding back a bit but I think it may be a blessing in disguise for him not to fight Klitschko yet. Chisora remains unbeaten professionally but he has only fought 14 times compared to Klitschko’s 55. A bad defeat could have ended his career before it even began.

However what was most interesting in this interview was the insight into Chisora’s character. Here is a man that has previous convictions for assault and last November was found guilty of beating up his girlfriend after he found text messages from another man on her phone. He avoided jail but received a 12-week prison sentence suspended for two years and was ordered to pay £1500 in compensation and serve 150 hours of community service.

Now nobody expects boxers to be held up as shining beacons of morality in our society but what Chisora said in regard to his conviction was quite unsettling. When quizzed about how his personal life will affect his boxing he rather proudly admitted, “I’m a rebel. You know what my boy Skepta says, ‘bun dat.’” This is to say, you know what, I don’t care.

His management team became very agitated with this line of questioning and would not allow any further questions on the subject. However the damage was already done. Chisora came across as an arrogant man who believes the rules don’t apply to him.

I for one am glad that this man has been denied the opportunity to represent Britain as Heavyweight Champion of the World.

Yianni Meleagros

PoliceTube: How Online Video is Helping Criminal Investigations

Youtube: A Place to share videos of yourself with those around you. What if those people were the Police? Would you still upload videos then?

Now more than ever before, Authorities are realising the power of online video; for making connections, for broadcasting appeals, and for finding the criminal who is responsible. We are all aware of CCTV and its effectiveness in monitoring the public. We are also aware of its impingement of privacy and the big brother culture of the world today.

You might think it is a bit of fun to upload a video of your friend mucking about causing crimes you don’t find particularly offensive. But you must remember that these videos are not anonymous. Police can track you down.

Amidst the Student Protests last December, hundreds if not thousands of crimes were committed, but for those unlucky enough to be filmed, it was only a matter of time until it got uploaded to the world wide web.

Every other day it seems that the BBC report stories of people being identified from amateur footage found online. Police are catching onto this and they’re becoming increasingly good at it. You can see the petrol bomb story on the BBC News website here.

Given the massive influence online video has in journalism, papers across Britain can link to the film on youtube, which will then encourage thousands of users to log on and have a look.

But Orwell can be kept at bay for the meantime, because by the same sword the Police fight by, the Police themselves can be slayed. See here for possible evidence of a Police man apparantly charging at protestors on horseback.

Online video is now not only helping convict civilians, but also helping with the conviction of the Police too.

To the right we see wheelchair-bound activist Jody McIntyre who was reportedly filmed being dragged from his wheelchair amidst the student protests. And below – the video footage which was uploaded to youtube that sparked controversy late last year.

Online Video has also helped police in a pro-active sense: They have now started uploading their own, in a bid to crack down on crime.  Thames Valley Police Unit in particular have taken this stance and issued videos asking for any witnesses to come forward with any informati0n they may have. They have asked for info on a 14 year old knee-capping via youtube and this morning on a case regarding sexual assault. See video below:

Yesterday it was announced that High Definition CCTV systems are currently being tested across the UK that are up to 50 times more powerful than traditional CCTV cams. They have thus far been installed at local authorities and service stations, and the Aviva stadium is reportedly using them.

Looks like we’ll soon see new CCTV footage in HD quality on youtube soon! Talk about getting with the times eh!


BBC Football video content finds the back of the net as is shown the red card

Every morning the first thing I do when I wake up is open my laptop and go straight to the BBC Football website. There I can get all the news of the day and the latest gossip and transfer rumours in the world of football. Now I am a massive football fan, I watch games from all over Europe and not just the big three leagues either. However my main obsession is with the English Premier League and for this in my opinion the coverage on BBC Sport is second to none. It may not have as many new articles every day and updated as regularly as but the quality is far superior.

Nowhere is this more obvious than in a comparison between the two websites’ video content. You would think with the massive money Sky pays to have the rights to Premier League football that their video content would be second to none but this isn’t the case.

Firstly with a much simpler, less cluttered and user friendly website, the videos on BBC Sport, all separately listed immediately grab your attention and you click on them. However with Sky Sports, all the video is in one window that shows you a freeze frame of one video for a few seconds before rolling to the next one. This means you have to wait to see screen shots of all the latest videos until you see one that interests you.

In the top right hand corner we can see the small video window where each video appears one by one.

Whereas on the BBC Football website videos are separated so you can see them all at once









These days people don’t want to waste time sifting through everything available to get the content they want. They want to be able to overview it all and pick out their favourites.

Another bone of contention for me with is the bloody adverts on every single video! These are not just short 20-30 second adverts but usually a minute and twenty seconds long. That’s just plain ridiculous! I realize they must make money through advertising but must they really put an advert of over a minute on every video? I mean who even watches these adverts? If I click on a video and it has an advert before it I will usually just click away immediately. I will only stick with it if it’s a video I really want to see but then I will just mute the computer and look at another page until it’s finished. For me this is something really need to sort out, whether it’s feasible to move them elsewhere or cut them to less than twenty seconds I don’t know, but I do know that nobody clicks on a video to watch an advert.

What makes the BBC football video content so good is that it offers different types of video. For example the vast majority of video content on is mainly interviews with players and managers, and their press conferences.  However on BBC they are more imaginative and offer a much wider variety of content.

Firstly what I really enjoy is Football Focus extra bits that lead up to the main programme on the weekend that often go behind the scenes at a football club and have expert opinion from their pundits. Moreover they try things out of the ordinary such as having David Cameron, Idris Elba and Kobe Bryant amongst others predicting the results of the weekend’s fixtures. (If you follow these links, you can see their predictions for yourself.)

I don’t think Sky Sports would ever have the cojones to try something like this. They are too comfortable in their middle of the road ways to try anything requiring a bit of imagination. The best you’ll get from them is Jamie Redknapp in a nice suit telling us how good his cousin Frank Lampard is!

Now don’t get me wrong, Sky Sports offers brilliant football coverage on TELEVISION. But they still have a lot to learn when it comes to online video, and they could do worse than taking a few tips from the Beeb.

UPDATE – After writing this blog and trying to embed my favourite BBC football videos on here, I found that the BBC won’t let you do that. Looks like their not so great after all! I was only able to embed the video above as it was on YouTube. It does illustrate my point quite well though; the BBC doing something different by taking us behind the scenes of one of Germany’s lesser well known clubs, Hoffenheim. However do let you embed their videos, it’s just a shame nobody would want to!

Yianni Meleagros

Why Charities are Embracing Online Video Journalism

It’s not just the media that’s embracing cheaper forms of broadcasting video journalism content. There is a whole wave of new age charities embracing not only social media but also online video journalism, capitalising on the latest, cheapest broadcast platform.

Non-profit organizations have quickly cottoned onto the social media trend as a hugely beneficial tool for communicating their cause to anyone connected to the internet which is estimated to be 1,407,724,920 people or around 21% of the world’s population.

Not only have charity campaigns flooded social networking sites like Facebook and YouTube, these organizations have increasingly embraced the use of online video journalism to advertise their campaigns in an extremely cost effective way.

Case Study 1: Oxfam

Oxfam has a section of its website devoted to campaign videos. Oxfam also has dedicated YouTube channels – Oxfam America and Oxfam Great Britain. Oxfam says that by letting people ‘see it, share it and change it’, they can help fight poverty and injustice by spreading the word using new media platforms. The channels feature videos about many of the charity’s different operations around the world. Check out this video below featuring a report on coffee giant Starbucks and its economic relationship with coffee farmers in Africa.

Case Study 2: Unicef

Unicef has a section of its website totally dedicated to blogs about their different campaigns. They also have a section just for Audio and Video. And of course they have a YouTube channel where Unicef TV is broadcast to its millions of viewers. Check out this report below on the increasing number of families crossing the border into Tunisia to escape the current crisis in Libya.

Case Study 3: Greenpeace

Greenpeace has a section of its website which showcases campaign promos, animations and video blogs. The organisation encourages other groups or individuals to spread the videos by embedding them on other websites. The channel has thousands of subscribers and has had over 13,850,000 channels views.

The video below is about a Chinese photographer Lu Guang. He documented the oil spill at the city of Dalian for Greenpeace. His pictures depict the death of firefighter Zhang Liang and won him a World Press Photo award in 2011. The online videos Greenpeace produces are of high quality both technically and journalistically, often covering very newsworthy stories from the corners of the globe.



Given that large charities such as the NSPCC spends millions on advertising on TV, it’s more than likely they will increasingly rely on the internet as a cheaper, faster and in some cases more accessibly media platform.


Natasha Malcolm-Brown

Yesterday’s Television, Today’s Online, Tomorrow’s Disposable News

Last year’s Leaders debate attracted 4.1 million viewers across Sky News, BBC News Channel and Sky3, but online streams only attracted 300,000 viewers. And yet, during the festive period there, 145 million web surfers checked in at Hotel BBC iPlayer! With youtube hosting 93 online news channels, why are we still turning on the box?

In this digital age, are we still dragging our feet across the analogue field of television, or do news junkies keep up to date via online videos? Nick Kwek investigates…

Zoe Morris watches mainly music videos online and would only choose to watch news online if there was a big story already established to follow. Not exactly one for online breaking news.

Josh Cheesman relies on youtube for amusing videos and subscribes to feeds and forums for updates. He feels news feeds are best watched on the official BBC and Sky News websites. A trusted news website suits him best.

Siobhan Schwartzberg chooses to look up youtube for individual speeches, or special packages. She wouldn’t log onto the BBC website for individual news packages, but rather prefers watching entire news programs. – something perhaps more comfortably done via television.

AH! Sorry about the lighting Tony. Alas, a peril of mobile shooting! Tony relies on BOTH television and the internet: the BBC website and Yahoo are his poison of choice for current affairs news feeds.

Okay, so these participants are hardly a broad spectrum of our society, but they are genuine case studies and they do give us various opinions about watching news online. Surprisingly, only Josh regularly watches news online as a principal source for his current affairs, but this is not so shocking when we bear in mind the statistics. Check this out, as shown by a BBC conducted study:

Only 1 in 10 people say they watch online video once a week, with a whopping 67% saying that they “NEVER and CANNOT conceive watching online TV in the future”! But, it appears as if they may not have a choice in the matter, with advertisers steadily spending billions online rather than television. Since 2007 in fact, there has been a fall in the number of television viewers and a marked rise in the number of viewers online:

Online figures have almost tripled in 4 years.

The obvious advantage for watching content online is that you can watch it any time you wish; day or night, you can still access the same material broadcast via television earlier that day or indeed before it is broadcast. You can watch it for as long as you like, there is always a pause button, and you can go back and watch it as many times as you wish. But whilst it may be a good thing that people are keeping up to date online at various instances throughout the day, is this not impinging on the quality of the news uploaded, and are we appreciating and taking it in as much as we should, knowing full well that disposable news is at our fingertips?!



I recently wrote about David Dunkley Gyimah. He is without doubt one of the greatest pioneers in video journalism. He has been instrumental in bridging the gap between video journalism and cinema and VJ is all the better for it.

He has been on the web since 1995 and his website is testament to his knowledge and know-how of mixing video journalism with the internet.

As an artist in residence at Southbank Centre, he offers great insight into the practice and philosophy of video journalism.

I interviewed him a week or two ago. It was a fascinating chat, which lasted over two hours. I have clipped out some of the best bits but there is so much more that I could have included.

I started by asking him what how much of an impact he thought the internet has had in terms of redefining video journalism?

How important is it for video journalists to be web savvy? Should they be able to do more than just blog?

Several years ago you were quoted as saying “people say videojournalism is like TV online, but videojournalism is experimental and risky.  I say it’s like being a photojournalist with a video camera.” How much have the aesthetics of videojournalism changed over the last few years?

And finally, here are David’s thoughts on the future of video journalism and experimentation.

Please add your comments. I am hoping to go to one of David’s forums at the Southbank Centre soon, so I will of course be reporting back from it as and when.

Will Teddy